Be (Para)normal: Lynn Rush, SMSU alumna and paranormal romance author, reads at Marshall-Lyon County Library

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On Oct. 8 at 7 p.m. the atmosphere in the Marshall-Lyon County Library became paranormally steamy. Lynn Rush read excerpts from her paranormal romance novels for the Visiting Author series held by the Creative Writing program at Southwest Minnesota State University. Rush graduated from SMSU in 1995 with a degree in psychology. She is from Minneapolis, and she now lives in Arizona.

Rush’s novels are published by Crescent Moon Press, and they are the first of a new literary market: new adult. New adult novels are meant to close the gap between young adult and adult books, and new adult is intended for readers ages 18-24.

Rush said, “New adult is a really interesting category that I’m honored to be the flagship author with Crescent Moon Press.”

For the reading, Rush read excerpts from her new novel, Violet Midnight. Violet Midnight is the first of what will be the Violet Night Trilogy. The series follows Emma Martin who is a college student slash vampire hunter. One excerpt was an action packed scene on campus where Emma was kicking vampire butt with mystical weapons that she summoned from thin air. Another excerpt was when the romantic interest, Jake, helps Emma back to her dorm after she fought supernatural baddies at the pool. Let’s just say things went beyond simply holding hands (but not all the way, of course).

Rush graduated from SMSU when she knew it as Southwest State University (SSU). She pointed out that Violent Midnight will have quite a few references to the college campus.

She also read the beginning of her novel Wasteland, which is the first book of a series about a male half demon.

During the Q&A session, a member of the audience asked Rush why she wanted to write new adult novels. She responded that even though she likes the books found in the young adult market, she did not want to write those kinds of novels.

“I didn’t really like the very detailed, bedroom door wide open, love scenes,” she said, “it’s just not me, and I knew that there were other people out there like me. So I thought I’m going to write what I love, and see where it takes me.”

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